Roslyn Fassett Artwork

What do I See?-Watercolor Collage

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What do I See?

” A lifetime of the artist drawing from the nude model has given way to placing the drawn figure within an atmosphere. Some paintings include a friend or partner. The figures may find themselves hidden, lost or within a mysterious cloud.” Roslyn Fassett Nov., 2020

(East) Coastal: Photographs by Jerry Novesky

Venue: Amity Gallery in Amity, NY

Opening Reception: Saturday, April 4, from 5 – 7 pm

Exhibit: Month of April, Saturdays and Sundays from 1 – 4 pm

(East) Coastal reflects more than 15 years of travel up and down the Atlantic Coast from Key West to Nova Scotia. The photos in this exhibit focus on major elements of the very special coastal environment. Where sea and land and sky meet, things seem to be just a bit more intense, more beautiful, more powerful.

Co-founder (with his wife, Janet Crawshaw) and former editor-in-chief of The Valley Table magazine, Jerry Novesky grew up in Middletown and earned a Master’s Degree in Creative Writing (poetry) from Ohio University. He has published dozens of articles and photographs in diverse publications ranging from Darkroom Photography and The American Fly Fisher to Audubon Action and American Health, and has edited more than two dozen books on natural history, outdoor recreation and Hudson Valley history.

Ilonka Karasz – Modernist Pioneer

There will be an opening reception for Ilonka Karasz’ artwork at the Albert Wisner Library in Warwick, NY on Sunday, March 8 from 1:00 pm until 3:00 pm. Paul Kane will give a short talk about her life and work at 1:30. 

In the early years of the last century, a fresh breeze from Europe blew through the world of art and design – a movement called “Modernism”. It was the time of Wiener Werkstätte design in furniture, colorful and original textiles, and astonishing interior decoration. Ilonka Karasz was part of this movement.

Born in Hungary in 1896, she was the daughter of a silversmith and grew up surrounded by the vibrant and colorful designs of Hungarian peasant art. She attended the Royal School of Arts and Crafts in Budapest, one of the first women to be admitted. She emigrated to the United States in 1913 and settled in Greenwich Village, then a lively center of the arts. In Greenwich village she felt free from the Old World prejudice that women could not compete with men in art, and quickly established herself as an artist of unique ability, diversity and energy. She worked with other European emigres to help establish the Modern movement in America, with an emphasis on the applied arts. They founded Modern art schools, published magazines, held important exhibits and established ties to manufacturers. Ilonka often found herself the only woman in these worlds, but moved on a par with the men, working in and winning reknown in a wide variety of fields, including textile, furniture, ceramics, silver, wallpaper and interior design, as well as magazine and book illustration.  She was a well-known designer of covers for “The New Yorker” magazine, designing 186 covers over five decades.  

Ilonka Karasz Photo Gallery from the show of her work at the Amity Gallery last year.

Throughout the many decades of her career, she was able to find a new and fresh expression for her art, experimenting with new materials and methods, and adapting to the changing times. This could be attributed partly to the fact that she had, from her earliest years, a deep appreciation of Nature, and a wish to
understand its laws. In her article “Inspiration” she wrote: “It is in us that God meets with Nature and yesterday parts from tomorrow. There is no other place to look for inspiration except in this unique place that man has within himself, where nature and all new possibilities exist.”

She was the wife of Willem Nyland, the founder of the Chardavogne Group in Warwick, NY, and lived here in the last years of her life. This exhibit at the Warwick Public library, which will open on Sunday March 8, 2020 and end on April 15, will give an overview of her career. There will be an opening reception from 1:00 to 3:00 pm in the Library’s Board room, with a talk given at 1:30 by Paul Kane

 

Ilonka Karasz Photo Gallery

Ilonka Karasz Design Work is an outstanding show that includes Karasz’ many New Yorker Magazine covers, her furniture and the design studies she did with her students.

This exhibit was arranged by Sue Bemel, Lyn Youland, and Tim Hull with brochure & card design by Kory Trolio. Special thanks to Ilonka Sigmund for the loan of many papers, photographs, and works of art from the family’s collection and to Roger Lipsey, from the Gurdjieff Foundation, for the loan of 17 mounted covers from “The New Yorker” magazine. Also included is work by her students.

Photos by Arlene Prince. Click on the thumbnail to see full size images.

Claire Gilliam – Life Lines

I began the series Life Lines two or three years ago, after coming into the possession of recent MRI scans of my brain.

 

I began the series Life Lines two or three years ago, after coming into the possession of recent MRI scans of my brain. The scans, which I spent hours pouring over, both fascinated and horrified me. Even though I’d always known the seriousness of it, I was suddenly confronted with visual evidence of the long ago but significant brain injury I’d sustained as a baby. A large dark mass on the left hemisphere still declaring loudly, after 40 years, my narrow escape. Around the same time, I also experienced a difficult and continuous period of profound familial loss.

Both these episodes left me thinking about the body in a very different way than I had before: I became interested in the biology and physiology of our bodies and the seemingly cruel, capricious way a body can behave, vacillating between strength and fragility. I began to make drawings from the MRIs, at first visually recording the brain itself, to understand how its structure and pathways form to activate the circumstances of the individual being we become. As the series has developed, the imagery has dissolved into abstraction, capturing something more existential. 

Please join me for the opening reception on Saturday, November 2 from 5.00-7.00pm (the Amity Gallery will be open to visitors from 1 pm)

The Gallery is open every weekend from 1.00-4.00 pm.

https://www.clairegilliam.com/

Patterns and Rhythms

 

John Toth is an intermedia artist who uses a computer as an instrument to explore the layering of sculpture, painting, music, sound, dance, video, film, and written text. This allows for relationships to be made between media.  His multi-perceptual collages explore the effects of presenting simultaneous impressions. The intent is to broaden the language of artistic expression and consider the ways in which our multiple sense effect the way we experience life around us.

Martha and Morgan Haude: Water and Clay

The August exhibit at the Amity Gallery will feature the watercolor paintings of Martha Haude and the ceramics of her daughter, Morgan Haude.

Martha Haude utilizes many objects that she has collected in her world travels as subjects for her watercolors.  She also loves gardening, another theme to be found in her watercolors.

Morgan Haude is a ceramicist and painter living in the Hudson Valley. She received her BFA from Alfred University and since 2007 has worked as a sculptor and painter for a prosthetic company. Clay has been a lifelong passion but she enjoys working in a wide variety of mediums and she is always looking for her next hobby.

 

LIFE FORMS

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Three Artists celebrate Life Forms in an exhibit at the Amity Gallery
Three artists, Jan Corash, Roslyn Fassett, and Phyllis Lehman, in their own way, celebrate the human form in an exhibit at the Amity Gallery in Warwick, NY.  The subject, the female nude, explores and reveals the vital and various ways one responds to this eternally revered subject.
I am interested on what a body says about life. states Jan Corash. Using charcoal and ink for a deep tonal range, she prefers a sketchy drawing, one that it not too neat, one where the hand clearly has presence.
Revealing nature and the feminine united has bee a lifelong interest of Roslyn Fassett.Her watercolor and graphite collages poetry the spirit and radiance of the earth and sky joined with mystical images of women.
Phyllis Lehman explains that in her acrylic and crayon painting of nudes, as with her landscapes, she prefers to be in the immediate presence of the subject as it reveals an aliveness fresh with nuances and surprises.
Their July show, Life Forms, will be exhibited at the Amity Gallery, 110 Newport Bridge Rd. in Warwick, The gallery, in the the quiet hamlet of Amity, is open weekends from 1-4pm. A reception will be held July 6 from 5-7pm.
Life Forms – Weekends in July 1-4pm